Deliveries

As a flower and gift shop in Singapore, we are often asked to arrange deliveries to a specific place, preferably at a certain time. 

It could happen to anyone to remember his anniversary in the very last hour.  But no bunking in with Lassie here, not this year: Where is the phone? “Hello Confetti, can you pronto presto ship before 1800 hours a dozen roses and a chocolate cake to Tampines, Simei Ave 101?” (Phew. Just made it.) 

Well, I am afraid not. Not only do some elements of the delivery, like cake, require three business days advanced notice, but driving it from our location to Tampines, squeezing through the congested highway at rush hour is just physically impossible. We may still make it  – with luck on our side – but just not within the hour as requested.

There are, however, ways to enjoy our islandwide delivery in Singapore and prevent the hassle of failed deliveries and the extra charges for redeliveries. 

  1. Always make sure the recipient is at home at the agreed delivery time! (See? Easy, isn't it?)
  2. For HDB flats the address has to be accurate, and at the unfortunately not quite so odd chance the recipient is not at home, allow us to leave the flowers at the doorstep or with a neighbour.
  3. Bypassing the security of condominiums can be tricky. Please alert us beforehand to any issues regarding access. Security almost always refuses to receive deliveries on the resident's behalf if nobody is home. And even if you know that the maid is actually on the premises, she may have been instructed not to respond to calls. Happens more often, than one may think! In other words, the delivery driver, in order to deposit flowers on the doorstep, has no way of gaining access to the floor of the recipient’s home in the building. Inevitably, this incurs the costs (there might be wastage) and the fees of redelivery.
  4. If sending to an office or place of business the problem is rather finding a merciful parking attendant than the delivering itself. Please ensure that you state the company name clearly at the checkout. If possible, share more details about the recipient, such as his or her full name, job title and department, under "Special Instructions”. This additional information will help to work with the building's security or company receptionist to locate the recipient quickly. Most times, the flowers will be accepted by a receptionist or fellow colleagues, who may then pass them to the mail room before they eventually reach the recipient. We do not take responsibility for the flowers after they have been signed off by an authorised personnel in the company. And more often than once our delivery deriver was to learn from the reception at the given address, that the recipient was no longer with the company or had moved up to a different location. In that case, redelivery charges are (again!) inevitable.
  5. Deliveries to hospitals require the full name under which the recipient is registered with the hospital. We also need the ward, room and bed number. Hospitals are ginormous and, without this information, deliveries are quite impossible and it may be advisable to have your flowers sent to the recipients actual home at a later date.
  6. For deliveries to an event in a restaurant, try coordinating with the restaurant manager and let them know that there will be flowers arriving at a chosen date and time. Then, let us know the name of your contact in the restaurant as well as the details of the reservation, such as table number and name of the recipient.
  7. Hotels are a pretty straight forward matter — provided we are given the name under which the reservation is under, as well as the room number. This information has to come from you, if necessary in an email to michael@confetti.com.sg, keeping us updated on changes and last minute check-ins, because the hotel if asked on the phone will withhold any of this information as a matter of standard privacy policies. 

So, with all this in mind, keep yourself up to date and let us know when you make your order. Nothing could be worse than to spoil an intended surprise with nothing turning up on that important occasion.


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